Wednesday, 17 May 2017

RSPB: New project launched to save Scotland's rarest insects

RSPB: New project launched to save Scotland's rarest insects: A new project is being launched in the heart of the Cairngorms National Park to save six of Scotland's rarest invertebrates.

Research: Geolocators reveal Connecticut Warblers' amazing migration

Research: Geolocators reveal Connecticut Warblers' amazing migration: A new study has revealed the monumental transoceanic feats of Connecticut Warblers during autumn migration.

RSPB: Second documented case of raptor persecution discontinued by court

RSPB: Second documented case of raptor persecution discontinued by court: RSPB Scotland has expressed its frustration and disappointment after another prosecution of an individual charged with wildlife crime offences was discontinued by the Crown Office in Scotland.

WWT: Godwit chick 'headstarting' represents UK first

WWT: Godwit chick 'headstarting' represents UK first: In a process known as 'headstarting', Black-tailed Godwit chicks have been hatched by conservationists for the first time in the UK.

Friday, 12 May 2017

Uncovering wildlife trafficking and animal exploitation


Pictured Richard Kinzler Chairman with Nick Bruschi & Manny Mvula at The Powell-Cotton Museum


The UN and INTERPOL have estimated that ‘eco-crime’ is worth $91-258 billion in 2016, the world’s fourth largest criminal industry, with wildlife trafficking alone worth approximately US$7-23 billion. Nick Bruschi is the Investigation Advisor in the Investigation and Evidence Team at World Animal Protection, a global animal welfare organization active in more than 50 countries.
The team are highly experienced at uncovering animal cruelty across Europe, Africa, Asia and the Americas. They work with enforcement agencies against wildlife crime, and advocate for animal protection in forums such as the United Nations. Nick will focus on the challenges faced by those responsible for fighting the illegal wildlife trade and how the syndicates themselves operate.
Nick highlight how the poaching and smuggling of so-called non-charismatic species – pangolins, parrots and tortoises – is no less important than the higher profile ivory crisis to understanding criminal methods, from exploiting poverty to bribing customs, and practising sophisticated tradecraft. Nick is also a Visiting Research Associate at King’s College London, where he obtained an MA in Conflict, Security and Development. He lectures on the nexus between climate and warfare, as well as the illegal wildlife trade, for the Marjan Centre for the Study of War and the Non-Human Sphere.